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not to meet with us. the message about our concern, again, not just those of the united states but britain and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not prov
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
is the negotiators are probably going to use a baseline that is different from the congressional budget office and senator warner talks about getting savings from the tax rates going up on what the americans. as i understand, it is already built into the cbo baseline. so, in terms of getting to that four to 6 trillion-dollar how much are we talking a lot in terms of real savings and in terms of tax increases, and how much are we talking about in terms of coming you know, just a redefined baseline? and then in the other question is can you give us an idea in terms of framework we are likely to see at the end of the year are we just going to see a bunch of top line number $800 billion with some sort of trigger or are we going to see the details, and if we see a bunch of top line numbers, how long does it take to get to feeling that an and drafting the legislation to get it through the congress? >> i would like to answer the second question. >> there is an old adage that says you don't learn a lot on the second kick in the shin from a mule. we've down this road of process. we have 12 fighting hig
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
to discuss the life and work of an exceptional american, dr. sandy greenberg, who is here with us today in the senate gallery along with his wife sue and his sister brenda even as we speak. sandy in my view, is an honorary delawarean because he spends a month out of every year at one of our most beautiful delaware beaches, rehoboth beach. but he's much more than that, a successful businessman and if i than throw pivot -- philanthropist, he has a wide array of business interests. he's a pioneer in the use of technology and medicine and helped bring telemedicine to rural health care facilities as chairman of the rural health care corporation. he was appointed by president clinton to the board of the national science foundation. and as a young man, he took a break from his studies at columbia where he roomed with art garfunkel to work in the nixon white house. all of this makes a substantive, meaningful contribution to our country. but there is one thing i have not yet mentioned. at the young age of 19, sandy went blind. he lost his sight, and with that all likely hope of a successful comp
to provide new housing opportunities through the use of project based vouchers. some of these suggest stream line processes and hud section 8 project base rental assistant program. we have invited secretary -- assistant secretary here to share the administration's recommendations on this important topic and i look forward to learning where there may be consensus around common sense reforms that will turn to section 8 an public housing assistant programs for families, partners, and taxpayers. are there any other members -- [laughter] >> that's a good question. >> yeah do you wish to make a brief opening statement? >> mr. chairman, thank you again, for holding this hearing, very important. welcome, madam secretary, and i look forward to your testimony thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you all and i want to remind my colleagues that the record will be open for the next seven days for opening statements and any materials who would like to submit. i will briefly introduce the honorable senator enriques the depart
will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm not leaving the fight. i hope to raise my game at
think it's important nonetheless for those of us who are concerned about the boundaries of privacy and feel like the law could be strengthened to make our case here in hopes that at some point we will be able to have the real type of consideration that these issues merit. in my opinion, there are serious reforms that need to be made before we consider renewing this law. this law is supposed to be about giving our government the tools it needs to collect communications of foreigners outside of our country. if it's possible that our intelligence agencies are using a law to collect and use to communicate to americans without a warrant, that's a problem. of course we can't reach conclusions about that in this forum because this is an unclassified discussion. my colleagues senator wyden and senator udall who serve on intelligence have discussed the loophole in the current law that allow the potential of back-door searches. this could allow the government to effectively use warrantless searches for the communications of law-abiding americans. and senator wyden has an amendment that relat
four years because helping u.s. job creators export shouldn't be a partisan issue. over 100 bilateral trade agreements are being negotiated today as we speak here on the floor. the united states is a party to none of them. we are a party to one multilateral trade agreement which i support but we need to get back engaged in bilateral agreements to open markets for our products, our service providers. we have been sittingr hands on the sidelines in an increasingly global and dynamic economy. this is the first administration actually since f.d.r. not to ask for the ability to negotiate trade agreements using expedited procedures. and this is something unique, trade promotion authority in order to negotiate agreements. this administration has yet to even ask for it over the last four years. last year we finally passed the korea, panama and colombia export agreements. hopefully our bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bip
we'd like to add indicate -- advocate the things that people sent us here to do. if we have something to say in an amendment, if we're in the minority, we'd like to have the chance to make that amendment. what a number of us are doing, we've been talking, is how can we do two simple things, how can we make it easier for the majority leader to get bills to the floor and how can we make it easier for the minority especially to be able to offer amendments? if we can do those o things, madam president, at the beginning of the year, i think the united states senate will begin to function much more effectively. it will be a better place to work. we'll get our job done in a better way. there will be less finger pointing and more results. there will be a change in behavior, which is what we really need instead of a change in rules. and it will inspire the confidence of the people of the united states about the kind of job we're doing. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor, and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
-handed pitch, a college baseball player and two of her granddaughters that worked for me as a page, for us as a page, rebecca and holly. when she's not at the desk -- and she spends long hours there -- mr. president, i don't go home early. i could call, she would be there, 9:00, 10:00 at night and that is no exaggeration. but she's not at that desk, janice was usually in georgia or north carolina with her children or grandchildren. now, she has probably been really political but i think she's gotten a little more political working for me. she's made sure each of her grandchildren makes sure they understand the importance of their political voice. during the recent election she called those eligible to vote to make sure they'd voted. and i didn't press very hard but she may have urged them how they should vote. while janice's accomplishments deserve recognition, it is janice herself who will be missed so dearly. she has served not only as a deeply trusted and committed assistant to me, but as a mentor to many who have worked with her. i know i'm not the only one who will note her be absence
of judge paul william grimm of maryland to be a u.s. district judge for the district of maryland. i'm very proud of the process that senator mikulski has instituted for us making recommendations to the president to fill judicial appointments. i believe that under this process, we have reached to get the very best to recommend to the president and then to our colleagues for confirmation, and judge grimm clearly falls within this line. the senate judiciary committee favorably reported judge grimm's nomination by voice vote on june 7 of this year. judge grimm was nominated to fill the vacancy in maryland that was created when u.s. district judge benson e.laig took senior status in june. judge grimm brings a wealth of experience to this position. early in his career, he served in the military in the judge advocate corps handling commercial litigation in private practice and served as assistant attorney general of maryland. he also sat as a federal magistrate judge in maryland for 15 years. judge grimm was born in japan and received his undergraduate degree from the university of california in
word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear that speaker boehner has needed cover from his right flank before he could agree to any deal on taxes with the president. the speaker didn't have it before, but he sure has it now. when "the wall street journal" editorial page says that decoupling would not go against conservatives' antitax principles, that gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. when grover norquist refuses to declare whether decoupling would violate his group's pledge, that, too, gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. and when more and more rank-and-file republicans come out publicly every day in favor of passing the senate bill, that, too, gives cover to the speaker. you really have to absolute cram tom cole. he was the first one on the other side to dare speak the truth about what should be done on taxes and he's been on tv almost every day making
is used to guide us, but a waste of money. the government should be involved in the. unfortunately, there are times when people evaluate investments that help our poorest children, the people in the toughest, most disadvantaged neighborhoods, some of our most intractable problems even with, for example, young people rescued from trafficking. these are very, very difficult problems. and we should evaluate and see what works. but we should also insist again there's not a double standard, so that if an evaluation, single evaluation or even a couple of evaluations somehow show that a particular strategy is not worth well, that is a motivation to do things better and smarter, not an excuse or reason to say government has no business being involved in that endeavor. so i think we need to be more change, accountability, evaluation, but not a tougher, higher double standard just when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can
should do in the northeast so that those airports today could really be used for longer distance travel. and that we use those that made the most sense which was rail in those corridors. that would garner us our expectation is pretty close to $5 billion in revenue a year, with about a billion plus or minus coming out of that in terms of profit. >> so you cannot do a direct correlation between california's high-speed rail and northeast corridor? they are two completely -- >> not here. excuse me. i don't know if your question is done. we can't, ma i can't draw that conclusion here because you don't have the right data sets. we may have some folks that have an analysis come and i can look at the and get you an answer back spent perfect. thank you. mr. hanna. >> thank you, chairman. hi, how are you. nice to have you here. advisory commission, you're in the process of developing several other reports analyzing the pressure that would be taken off, projected pressure off of airlines, off of roads and what that means to the northeast will that report be done and what we we be able to get out o
in the usual form, upon the use or yielding back of that time the senate hat proceed to vote with no intervening action or debate on calendar number number 830 and 832 in that order. that the motion to proceed be considered made and laid on the table with no intervening action or debate and there would be no further motions in order. and any statements related to this matter be printed in the are appropriate place as if given and the president be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to a period of morning business until 1:45 p.m. today with senators permitted to speak up to ten minutes each. further that senator snowe be recognized at 1:00 p.m. for -- why don't we -- yeah, 1:00 p.m. for up to 45 minutes. finally at 1:45 p.m. the senate proceed to executive session as provided under the previous order. madam president, if you would rule on that. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: m
.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act
negotiations. this is about a half an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> morning. thank you all for joining us this morning. i'm maya macguineas, i am working with the campaign to fix the debt, and i'm the president for the committee for a responsible federal budget, and i'm really excited to join a phenomenal panel that we have with us today to help the campaign fix the debt which is, um, a large, nonpartisan coalition that is focused on helping members of congress come together to put in place a comprehensive debt deal. so i'm very delighted that today what we have is a diverse and very experienced, um, group of panelists to talk about two major topics; tax reform and health care reform. all in the context of how are we going to work together to put in place a plan that would be able to tackle the nation's fiscal challenges. we will hear numerous different opinions, we will hear plenty of disagreement, and i hope we'll hear a lot of ideas about how to generate different, um, useful reforms to the budget that can help get a big deal put in place. and none of us should forget that what's going
impression on a great many people around the world, and especially on the 100 of us who serve here. he commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for
been a tendency, not just in case of eastern libya but i think across the world in recent years for us to focus too much on specific credible threat. and sometimes lose the forest through the trees. i think that's something that we were painfully reminded of in the case of the benghazi attack, and we need to do better at. there's some specific recommendations the accountability review board has made that we will implement relentlessly in the state department. we will certainly work with the rest of the intelligence community. >> finally, reading from the report again and having listened to both ambassador pickering and admiral mullen's, where they made it very clear that while there are many mistakes that were made, the outline and respond to do, that significant problem here is resources. we can either head in the sand or we can ultimately meet that challenge. where they say it's imperative for the state department to be mission-driven rather than resource constrained. particularly with being increasingly -- so in that respect, i hope that when you present your budget, at the same tim
us from england, and to make us free. human rights day is about advancing equality and the american constitution as it has expanded over the years to include new groups of people and strike down barriers of race and gender, ethnic background, national origin. it is about the progress of human rights and equality, the noblest of causes for this nation and what brings us together in many ways as americans. the fight for freedom. the search for equality. and justice. and i want to talk about three specific ways that we can advance the cause of human rights in this chamber, in this session through measures that are before us. the first concerns human trafficking. i've been particularly interested in the rampant human trafficking problems on american bases abroad in places like iraq and afghanistan. victims are recruited from third countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confisc
amendments in order and upon the use or yielding back of time on those amendments, the senate proceed to vote in relation to the coburn amendments, with all provisions of the previous order remaining in effect. the presiding officer: no objection? without objection. ms. mikulski: mr. president, simply what this means is this, and i'm really asking for the senators to pay attention on this. so -- because they're very keenly interested in the schedule, and i really want to thank the distinguished senator from mississippi, senator cochran, for working on the expeditious disposition of our amendments. senators should be aware that after 2:00 p.m., they should be in the chamber to vote on these amendments. these are ten-minute votes and we do not intend to hold the votes beyond the time. the leadership on both sides of the aisle will be going to the white house to discuss the really critical, crucial matters before the nation. they must go to the white house but they will want to exercise their vote. so let's cooperate with the leadership. at 2:00, senator coburn will make his debate, we'll have a
time really being called out as a problem. problem. >> dysfunction and u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is an accountable. >> senate finance committee chair max baucus left capitol hill earlier this week to give his thoughts on what's called the fiscal cliff and negotiations that are currently underway. he spoke at an event hosted by campaign to fix the debt, a group cofounded by alan simpson and erskine bowles, the former coaches of the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform. he spoke for about 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. >> thank you. it was a traffic panel on health care. now we are really going to have a special guest. chairman baucus who is the chairman of the senate finance committee, and we will talk both about the budget negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whate
the rhetoric being used by some on the other side to describe this tax relief, i would like to take this time to correct the record. but first during this talk about the fiscal cliff and about the tax cuts that sunset at the end of the year, all we've been hearing since the election is about what are we going to do about taxes? that's a very significant thing as a result of the last election because i think it's a foregone conclusion there's going to be more revenue raised. but if we raise the amount of revenue that the president wants raised and raise it from the 2% that he wants to raise it from -- the wealthy -- that's only going to run the government for eight days. so what do you do the other 357 days? or if you look at the deficit, it will only take care of 7% of the $1 trillion-plus deficit that we have every year. what about the other 93%? so the point being that we can talk about taxes and taxes and taxes, but it's not going to solve the fiscal problems facing our nation. we don't have a taxing problem. we have a spending problem. and so we should have been spending the last three we
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
states, et cetera, i used to be able to quote it, i don't think i can now. anyway, it's written down. and the preamble is important saying we the people. but is not the only thing. and i say that because i do think, i had a very interesting conversation in china, i thought. i've gone there twice. the first time was a few years ago, maybe eight or 10, when we went to beijing and then we went to shanghai. and in shanghai we are asked to meet with a group of businessm businessmen, and these businessmen have all been involved in the.com. they lost a lot of money. most of them have made a lot back. so they're talking, and i was fascinated with his. one of them said i prefer the cultural revolution. the others said, what? he said the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i'
as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm
and maybe have two words that we have not used throughout this that were so popular at the time with respect to understanding what gorbachev was trying to do. perestroika and -- and he was attempting to change the soviet union internally even as he was in gauge with us and talking about forces out of control, that is a lot to have going on at the same time and it's in many respects a wonder he held onto it for as long as he did. >> rick, you mentioned earlier on that the russians made a fundamental mistake when they moved the ss-20's in. where they're in a fundamental mistakes that the u.s. president made? >> you know, i think on the management of this issue like i said we almost ran into a couple of issues here. but we kept it on the road. i have to say, because you know i think about the last 20 years, 30 years of u.s. foreign-policy, in particular in the last 10 years. i to call it the disciplining impact of working within the alliance. we were genuinely, because this was an alliance, both on the negotiating side because in order to deploy in these countries, government suppression had to
it off for commercial uses. that could include financial rewards associated with the revenue from its subsequent auction for commercial use. it could also include structure rewards in the budget and appropriations process, and finally i think that these ideas are consistent with the idea of synthetic currency which was proposed by the president's council of advisors of science and technology. in their recent report on federal spectrum use. >> thank you. i guess my last question to the chairman, commissioner pai suggested june 30, 2013 as a deadline for the auction to is that a reasonable or an achievable date? >> i think i stand be corrected but i think 2014. >> 2014, sorry. >> so 2014 is when we're talking to a deep we will know more about what would maximize the benefits of the auction as comments coming. but we're certainly on a path to conduct the auction in 2014. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> gentlelady yield back the gentlelady yield back about summertime. chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky for five minutes. >> i really appreciate the commissioners for being here toda
the audience all of us have chapters in our lives, milestones. my important -- my most important chapter, he said, was a battle creek chapter. this is where i learned what democracy was all about. wherei learned what america wasl about. -- where i learned what america was all about. to impart any lessons about america on dan inouye would have been an honor but we may have taught him pales in comparison to what he tots. a few years ago danny told an audience that our greatness as a nation lies in part in our willingness to recognize the flaws in our past, including our treatment of japanese-americans, and our determination in whatever limited way we could to make amends. dan inouye served his country because of his dream of what we could be, a nation unbound by our all-too-human failings. he believed to his core that we are able to shed old prejudices and that our nation, de despiter flaws, shines with such bright promise that we can inspire remarkable service and sacrifice. a nation so great that those we treat with disdain or even hatred can respond with love that knows no limit. love is po
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
and fabulous and amazing. pick your favorite color this is brand new u.s. the first audience to see id.it is scheduled tonight but i did not think it will be there so you should get yours now item213-857. i am so excited! we have a lot of fun things coming. we would love to hear from you 1-866-376-8255 >>host: also definitely join us in the live chat we have someone there that will be saying hello to you. we love girls and the live chat. nload that application for free bite diallingtar star hsn.you can also join me on facebook page i am colleen lopez on hsn. i hope you are in the mood for shopping because we have special things in store for you. including the biggest and best value ever on the herkimer quartz is our beautiful earring today's special, hit it comes [♪ music ♪] >>host: look at the gorgeous collette she is dripping and herkimer. if you fell asleep last night, we knew this would be popular but almost 16,000 are out the door. majority of our day supply gone in the midnight showing. if you have been looking for the most gorgeous uniquely beautiful earring (...)this wi
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
for veterans like me who struggle to walk or to use a wheelchair. very fortunately for me, the united states leads the world in accessibility and equality of opportunity for our disabled. unfortunately, the advantages we take for granted here at home that allow people like me to live fulfilling, independent lives don't exist in much of the rest of the world. eight short months after being wounded in combat, and while still a patient at walter reed, i joined -- i'm speaking for him -- i joined a few friends in a trip to south africa to watch the world cup. there -- there i found myself in a different country, with no legs, a brand-new wheelchair and a lot of apprehension. and while i should have been enjoying this once-in-a-lifetime trip, i was constantly worried about my ability to get around. would the rest rapt have an accessible bathroom or would i have to go without it? would my wheelchair be able to fit in the hotel doorway or would i need to be carried into the lobby? those are the kinds of questions we take for granted here in america, but unfortunately the accessibility measures that
training curriculum that includes the required font training conclude that fra expects us to complete the creek and by the end of this calendar year. finally, all stakeholder agreements need to be completed in order for fra to disperse obligated funds to project grantees. prior to publication of for a insured the grantees are all long-term projects completed service outcome agreements. these agreements outlined that result from the infrastructure investments. while every obligated all the funds within the mandated deadline, other required agreements related to maintenance and construction were not complete. that deadline for extending our funds in completing construction is september 2017, a compress timelines for complex projects such as creating a new rail corridor or expanding or reconfiguring an existing one. for projects with manus and construction agreements that remain outstanding, the time when for completion becomes even more compressed. short-term projects which were intended to stay in the economic recovery have also been delayed. fra originally planned on obligating funds
-bearing accounts at banks and credit unions. these transaction accounts are used by businesses, local governments, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations for payroll and other recurrent expenses. and this program provides certainty to businesses in uncertain times. these accounts are also important to our nation's smallest financial institutions. in fact, 90% of community banks with assets under $10 billion have tag deposits. this program allows these institutions to serve the banking needs of the small businesses in their communities, keeping deposits local. in my state of south dakota, i know that the tag program is important to banks, credit unions, and small businesses. our nation's economy is certainly in a different place than it was in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis when this program was created. but with concerns about the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-year extension makes the most sense. it provides the most certainty for business and financial institutions. it also
of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
economists and i'm pleased that a frequent contributor to aligns programs are gail, thanks for joining us today. >> [inaudible] >> you should see a red light. >> thank you, ed. i'm delighted to be here but i'm going to try to make four or five points quickly, and i look forward to the discussion. i found the analysis that we just heard that kaiser family foundation has done very interesting in looking what they see as the likelihood of what would happen if the increase in eligibility were to be instantly implemented in 2014. although as has been indicated, that is generally not the proposal. and while i appreciate the qualification, i think it's important to understand there was one assumption that was never made, and that is that they would be any behavioral change as a result of the change policy. for many of us who support the notion of increasing the age of eligibility for medicare, and i'm going to qualify in a minute, it would be within the context of part of a set of fiscal policies that need to be enacted in order to encourage individuals to change their vision of appropriate reti
of the show use express' ordering because we are very busy. tamara hooks is coming up. >>guest: thank so much guy yovan and. we will continue with steam but this time we will be cleaning with it. t you love about the bissell steam shot simasteamer you can clean pretty much every surface in your hall without chemicals using just the power of steam. two of everything is fault two pack normally if you were to purchase separately all today you did everything. you get the lavender and the probe study pearl wasabi, this will allow you toclean all of that would 0 chemicals we will go to critter copal into dulles marled budded >>guest: --we will go to peter kulka lekilcullen tells us about it. you get the power of steam to clean your house and you are getting two of them today. when we talk about chemical free cleaning think about steam as a natural disinfectant. you what this cutting board to be claimedean, you are doing without chemicals all over the house. the grease and grime on the pot deadpans is the same thing the bissell will do the same thinking -- for your pots and pans. this will work
requires the government obtain a warrant any time it seeks to conduct direct surveillance on a u.s. person. indirect surveillance of u.s. persons by means of backdoor searches should be no different. no one disputes that the government may have a legitimate need to search its fisa data base for information about a u.s. person, but there is no legitimate reason why the government ought not first obtain a warrant by articulating and justifying the need for its intrusion on the privacy of u.s. persons. our constitutional values demand nothing less. unfortunately, we won't be voting on such an amendment later today. so our reauthorization of fisa will include a grant of authority for the government to perform backdoor searches, seeking information on individual american citizens without a warrant. i believe such searches are inconsistent with fundamental fourth amendment principles. for this reason, i cannot support the fisa reauthorization, and i urge my colleagues to oppose the bill in its current form. i'd like next to speak about a few amendments that i think would make some improvements t
be pretty, pretty strong and undeniable, you know? it must be something like, you know, it helps us identify somebody that's about to set off a nuclear bomb in the middle of new york city or something like that, you know, in order to be compelling. well, you know, the argument is that if you use racial discrimination in college admissions, um, it's likely that there will be somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations among students and that the african-american kids and the latino kids, you know, who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is, just has overwhelming, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -
government in 2003. this road will contribute to the economy, enabling us to contribute to the regeneration of uk? >> can i thank my honorable friend for campaigning assiduously for this. he has made a very strong case for how this new road will open up the prospect really economic governments as well as dealing with traffic congestion. and it's exactly the program we can undertake that didn't happen under the last labour government because we made the switch. again, i congratulate him for the campaign he has fought which i think is -- [inaudible] >> given the falling number of nurses in the nhs, does he recognize that people view with skepticism what you said about protection to the nhs? will he acknowledge that passing on a 2% cut to local government will cut adult social services across the country? the foldable, the disabled, the elderly. >> just -- for so we provided billions more, but -- let me just say this point to the labour party. they want to be in government and they claim they want to cut the deficit. what would they cut? what would they cut? if they object to the local governm
of tomorrow's only broadband and not broadcast. >> host: senator gordon smith joins us as we begin part of discussions on the future of television. he is the president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. thank you, sir. >> guest: thank you. >> host: and ted gotsch of "telecommunications report," thank you b the for being on "the communicators." >> thanks for having me. >> just ahead, the first of two forums from a recent conference examining the 201 2 elections with jeremy byrd. then two secretaries of state discuss the impact of voter id laws. after that we're hive from the brookings institution on the future of egypt following it constitutional refer dumb, and later another live forum examining a proposal to raise medicare's eligibility age. >> also today a discussion with some of the leaders who have helped create what's known as e-government. this month marks the tenth anniversary of the act that was helped to allow federal agencies to deliver information for mishtly using the -- efficiently using the internet. you can see live coverage beginning at 9 a.m. eastern o
students. many of us have talked about this in the past. we have to be more aggressive in dealing with the mental health needs of all the people in our community. and as chairman leahy pointed out, we must discuss the issue about the ready access of individuals to weapons. now, i know there are different views in this congress. i must tell you, i don't understand why we need to allow access to military-style assault weapons and ammunition. i strongly support senator feinstein's effort to reinstate the expired 1994 ban on assault weapons, including a ban on ammunition magazines that hold more than ten rounds. senator durbin has raised a very valid point. we regulate automobiles, we regulate consumer products, we regulate a lot -- as we should for public safety. and we should regulate firearms for public safety reasons. there's no need for assault weapons to be held by the public. in my view, there's no legitimate reason for a civilian to possess a military-style weapon or to have large-capacity ammunition clips. congress should also examine whether we can strengthen our background
] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a difference to us. when i think about what makes a successful of the law school, having a diverse, inclusive and collaborative community about standing -- outstanding students, faculty, alumni, and friends, gives us -- the members here come and there are several, very supportive a lawns, professors, this community can come together and really make a difference. and you all matter in so many ways, so want to thank all of you. i can't name you all, but you really help make us successful. now, when justice ginsburg agreed to, she said don't want to give a lecture, but i would like a fireside chat. and i said that would be lovely. and then gave myself a challenging assignment of coming up with a plan for our conversation. it was easy to know where to start, which is what a pioneer you have been, and many people here forget that in the 1950s there were very few women in law school. if you might start by reminding those who remember, and helping to enlighten those who don't, what that was like. >> in those ancient days, i began law school
which allowed us to be just as accommodating as we humanly could. again, the balance of my statement will be put into the record, but one person i want to single out is someone who has worked for the committee for 41 years. this will be her last year, chris cower. she is our chief clerk. i just wanted to take an additional two seconds to mention her name as a symbol of the staff that we're so grateful for. i don't know if senator mccain is here but i know that i speak for him about our staffs and about our colleagues on the committee. i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the question is on the bill as amended. is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators wishing to change their vote? if not, on this, yate are 98, the nays are sphere row. the amendment, as amend, is passed. under the previous order, the committecommittee on armed servs discharged from further consideration of h.r. 4310, and the senate will proceed to the consideration of the measure which the clerk will report. the
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